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Is It Worth Looking Around For In Australia?


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4 replies to this topic

#1 Muttley

Muttley
  • PCS Club Member
  • Joined: 12-July 17
  • Location:Perth
  • Location: Waikiki

Posted 30 August 2017 - 09:20 PM

Hey everyone,

 

I was just wondering if L183 Ancistrus dolichopterus also known as the starlight bristlenose pleco is available in australia? My wife loves how they look and if it's something that might be possible I'd happily hunt around for a few. However if they are not really available in australia/WA we'll have to settle for the peppermint bristlenose that I have seen around which loses the white edging on it's tail/fins at maturity.  If anyone has any idea's, any help is appreciated, but if not the peppermint's are also quite pretty so it sure ain't a bad backup ;-)

 

cheers 


Edited by Muttley, 30 August 2017 - 09:21 PM.


#2 Chris Perth

Chris Perth
  • PCS Club Member
  • Joined: 21-June 02
  • Location: Eaton

Posted 01 September 2017 - 05:33 PM

Many years ago (prior to internet information overload) there was a school of thought that A.dolichoptrus/hoplogenyes was in fact what was sold under the trade name of Peppermint in Australia. I understand that ID is as simple as counting the dorsel rays one hard and 9 soft but as I dont have peps so I cant do that - perhaps some peppy owners could oblige.
So it may well be that the L183's that you seek are in fact what we call pepperments - perhaps Johnno or others could be more illuminating

#3 bigjohnnofish

bigjohnnofish
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  • Joined: 02-August 10
  • Location: Banjo Country aka just past Mundaring

Posted 03 September 2017 - 02:50 AM

Ĺ071 , L181 , L249 more likely resemble what we have in Australia.... these 3 numbered fish could well be the same just collected from different tributaries of the Amazon.... its also been said by some very old and wise fish keepers the peppermint bn we have is most likely a hybrid anyway... the fact that pepps wont cross breed with other ancistrus backs up hybrid theory as L183 is ancistrus dolichopterus and doesnt crossbreed with ancistrus sp. So possibly what we have has some L183 in it or a variation of L183... no one really knows with 100% certainty

#4 Chris Perth

Chris Perth
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  • Joined: 21-June 02
  • Location: Eaton

Posted 03 September 2017 - 09:40 AM

Johnno is it possible for you to catch one of your mature peps and do a dorsal fin ray count? Or post a pic of an extended dorsal ?
Having consulted the trusty Aqualog I can see that what appears to be mature L183 retain the white edging on the dorsal and caudal fins which I am given to understand that our pepermints lose with maturity, so ours may not be true L183's
But as you say Johnno "no one really knows with 100% certainty"

#5 Muttley

Muttley
  • PCS Club Member
  • Joined: 12-July 17
  • Location:Perth
  • Location: Waikiki

Posted 04 September 2017 - 05:19 PM

Thanks for all the info everyone, it's really quite interesting that being isolated in australia and with import restrictions over the years has resulted in something like the peppermint pleco. Then it's gotten to be so wide spread in australia even though it's probably a hybrid. Still a gorgeous fish though I have to admit ;-)

 

Cheers again everyone.






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