Jump to content





PCS & Stuart M. Grant - Cichlid Preservation Fund - Details here

PCS Photo Competition 2017 - Enter Now - Details here

September PCS Meeting  - Breeding 101 Tues 5th September - Details soon

September Fish of the Month - Altolamprologus calvus "Black" - Details soon


Photo

New Pilbara Species


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 keleherr

keleherr
  • Forum Member
  • Joined: 03-October 04
  • Location:Spearwood
  • Location: spearwood

Posted 11 August 2017 - 03:14 PM

Unfortunately found these guys in the upper Fortescue River over a 25km reach. They popped up on the second round of sampling so they haven't been in there too long. Will be going up again shortly to see how far they have spread and try work out an eradication plan to try remove them before the next flood.

 

Attached File  20689991_773398612838892_8956318536423314571_o.jpg   98.95KB   6 downloads

 

https://www.facebook...?type=3

 



#2 Mr_docfish

Mr_docfish
  • PCS Club Member
  • Joined: 29-July 07
  • Location: Canning Vale WA

Posted 12 August 2017 - 06:46 PM

Curious to know how they got up there.... not many people keeping aquarium fish in that neck of the woods.... :|
Either used as bait or someone using them to control mozzies in water holes that overflow during floods.... either way, rare to see green sailfin mollies - most mollies imported and sold for the aquarium trade are coloured.

#3 ice

ice
  • Forum Member
  • Joined: 18-January 07
  • Location: Huntingdale, WA

Posted 14 August 2017 - 07:26 AM

They breed so quickly and readily I wouldn't be surprised if a bit of natural selective breeding has already happened and the green ones are simply the most likely to survive.

 

Curious to know what the numbers were like, I'd have thought the native predatory fish would have made short work out of a flat sluggish molly, really hope they don't survive, there are enough ferals in our waterways as it is.



#4 keleherr

keleherr
  • Forum Member
  • Joined: 03-October 04
  • Location:Spearwood
  • Location: spearwood

Posted 14 August 2017 - 09:37 AM

We found them below Ophthalmia Dam in Newman so might have been released by someone leaving town. Only other fish there are spangs, bows and hyrtl's. The second round of sampling happened during a flood pulse so numbers would have been thinned out from the original few pools. We caught 20 over a 25km  which was about 10km back from pulse head.

 

 

We sampled above the dam and didn't find them but will be going back to check out the dam and how far down they have made it. Plan is to knock them off before they reach the marsh which would allow them to reach the lower Fortescue if the marsh maintains water and a decent cyclone hits



#5 ice

ice
  • Forum Member
  • Joined: 18-January 07
  • Location: Huntingdale, WA

Posted 14 August 2017 - 10:19 AM

Yeah I would have thought spangs would make short work of them. What's the plan of attack? Netting?

#6 keleherr

keleherr
  • Forum Member
  • Joined: 03-October 04
  • Location:Spearwood
  • Location: spearwood

Posted 14 August 2017 - 10:40 AM

If they aren't in the dam or mash we will wait till the river pools up to hopefully a few small pools then hit them with pumps, netting and rotenone. Things have been complicated by Ophthamia dam needing to release as it is about to burst, so we have to hold off a bit. If they are in the dam it might be too late but from the previous survey I don't think they are.



#7 ice

ice
  • Forum Member
  • Joined: 18-January 07
  • Location: Huntingdale, WA

Posted 14 August 2017 - 11:31 AM

Let's bloody hope not! Best of luck with it.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users