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Nitrate Reductors


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10 replies to this topic

#1 Krystal

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Posted 04 June 2009 - 09:57 PM

Nitrates (N03) can come from various sources but the most common causes for having excess nitrates in the aquarium are from over-feeding, over stocking and poor maintenance routines. Nitrates are the final result of the nitrogen cycle. When ammonia is produced in the aquarium, bacteria called Nitrosomonas convert this ammonia into Nitrite, secondly another bacteria called Nitrobacter converts Nitrite into Nitrate. Unfortunately we are left with Nitrate as a direct result and it must be diluted before it gets to harmful concentrations.


The Nitrate Reductor is an external filter which works on a very slow rate, this allows the environment to be anaerobic (oxygen free) and also allows the water to have a greater retention time, approximately 2-4 hours, with the media inside the canister.
The Nitrate Reductor utilises an anaerobic environment in which the process is created. This anaerobic environment alone is not enough to consume nitrates as the bacteria has no ‘food’ source, in this particular system the food source can be added in two separate ways.
The first is via the injection port on top of the unit, here the Denimar tablets or Denimar powder can be added directly to the system when needed. The only problem with this method is the sheer amount of monitoring and dosing required, often up to a few times a week, this method is best as a short term solution or ideal for helping to establish the system. The second way is a much more stable and user friendly method, it utilises a product called Deniballs. Deniballs are a sphere like carbon ‘food’ source and are placed directly into the Nitrate Reductor, they are slowly consumed as needed and need replacing approximately every 12-24 months.

Water is fed into the unit using the supplied 4mm airline via a T-piece. This T-piece is placed inline on the outlet of your canister filter or via a power head placed inside your aquarium. A small tap is also placed inline so that the amount of water being feed into the unit can be regulated. Inside the unit is an internal circulation pump, the purpose of this is to circulate water inside the chamber to rid the water of any oxygen and to minimise any dead spots. The Nitrate Reductor has one inlet and one outlet, as aquarium water is fed into the unit, it slowly passes over the media where is utilises the nitrates from the aquarium and is then forced back into the aquarium via the 6mm airline on the outlet of the Nitrate Reductor. The reason for the larger outlet is so that it does not clog up with slime as fast, therefore minimising maintenance. As water is returned back to the aquarium it is virtually nitrate free. The water is returned back to the aquarium via a dropper at a flow rate of approximately 1-2 drips per second, this will vary with different models and situations.



Your aquarium will never be completely nitrate free but with this system it can significantly reduce the levels to an optimum for your inhabitants, significantly reducing the nitrates in between water changes. It is not a replacement for water changes, just a means of reducing the frequency of water changes and maintaining a more stable environment. Nitrate Reductors will also be beneficial in heavily stocked aquariums and marine setups with sensitive inhabitants.

AQUOTIX specialise in, and stock, a wide range of nitrate reductors at any one time. We have installed the AquaMedic 5000 Nitrate Reductor on one of display tanks for demonstration purposes. Feel free to come in and talk to one of our staff, they will be happy to show and demonstrate to you the best Nitrate Reductor for your particular requirements.

#2 dazzabozza

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Posted 11 June 2009 - 09:09 PM

Thanks heaps for taking the time to prepare this write-up Krystal. The input from the Aquotix crew on the forum is greatly appreciated.

ThanxSmiley.gif

For anyone wanting to read up on some of the first-hand experiences in using denitrators see - http://www.perthcich...showtopic=16888


Dazza

#3 convict paul

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Posted 11 June 2009 - 09:40 PM

wow thanks for that! makes me wanna get one... will give me more study time and less maintenance on my tank biggrin.gif
cheers krystal!

wink.gif Paul

#4 Krystal

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Posted 11 June 2009 - 09:47 PM

No worries Daz...we are happy to help out smile.gif

Cheers Paul but dont forget that they are not a replacement for maintenance by any means but a way in maintaining a stable environment and reducing the nitrates in between your normal water changes.

#5 convict paul

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Posted 11 June 2009 - 09:51 PM

yeah. but say i am to busy to do one or forget...
less nitrate means healthier water, healthier fish!

#6 red_devil

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Posted 17 December 2010 - 01:48 PM

has anybody tryed this form of nitrate removal

www.Aquaripure.com/intl/

thinking of givivng it a try your thoughts would be appreciated

#7 Mr_docfish

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Posted 17 December 2010 - 03:09 PM

it is a standard denitrator - note the description is incorrect, as these anaerobic bacterial units do not consume organics, only the nitrates. This info provided on the first page is misleading. You still need to add a cellulose base as a food source (eg: deniballs by aquamedic) for the bacteria to consume in order for them to utilize the nitrates. For the price, plus freight and warranty issues, might not be worth chasing these ones when we already have better units available in Oz.

#8 Neakit

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Posted 17 December 2010 - 04:35 PM

this is just carbon dosing you don't need a filter to do what it does. However if not done correctly it can cause havoc. More info here http://www.masa.asn....p/Carbon_Dosing

#9 Mr_docfish

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Posted 17 December 2010 - 11:33 PM

This is why Aquamedic invented the deniballs... they are basically cellulose, which breaks down slowly (as compared to alcohol and other sugars) so it is a form of slow release organic for the bacteria to feed on.

Using the filter cannister with a powerhead internally to increase the water movement within the cannister, you can get more water flow through the anaerobic unit, and therefore more effective breakdown of nitrate in a short period of time in a known rate of flow. It is one of the best forms of nitrate reduction when considering long term, constant reduction. Once settled in (about 6 weeks) it can be left alone for up to 2 years (more if the nitrate load is normally lower) before any maintenance is needed... just keep a regular eye on the flow. It is best to talk to someone that has already used one of these units to get first hand information and assistance in setting one of these units up.... alternatively, for those that are competent, if they read the instructions carefully and completely, you can work it out with a little effort.

If you ever have any issues with one of these units, it is best to talk to Krystal or myself as soon as possible so we can advise the best steps to take to make these units work for you. Too many people out there that dont have anyone to get advice from, give up too easily or cause problems for their fish because they do not understand how to use them properly.

#10 red_devil

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Posted 19 December 2010 - 11:17 PM

Thanks for the info will give it a crack so will prob ask a few questions thanks again and merry Xmas to all

#11 sandgroper

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Posted 05 January 2011 - 11:50 PM

I love these filters,they maintain your nitrates and if you keep doing your regular water changes your nitrates will come down.If you miss one then its no big deal.I give them the thumbs up.cheers steve.




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