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How Much Faith Do You Have In Your Test Kit Results?


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36 replies to this topic

#21 Mattia

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Posted 08 June 2017 - 07:05 PM

Not sure how just one different bell sound, but we use API test kits at the shop and so far I can't really say that they're THAT BAD.
I even tested water with JBL and API kits next to each other and got pretty similar results... BUT, said that, we do loads (too many sometimes ) tests per days, and our bottles can be considered always "Fresh" ... maybe it has to do with how people keep and maintain their test kits?
Once I left my test kits in car for a week.... it was full summer..... :D

#22 Delapool

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Posted 08 June 2017 - 09:46 PM

I do wonder if my old test kit had drifted a bit. Was still within use-by date but bottle almost empty when I put it in the bin.

 

Below it seems that any nitrites can muck up the tests? I know normally not the case in a cycled tank but was interested in different methods.

 

(general info)

https://en.wikipedia...ki/Nitrate_test

 

(also notes nitrites can be an issue)

http://appslabs.com....and_nitrite.htm

 

(see FAQ #2 on nitrites)

http://www.seachem.c...est-nitrite.php

 

I saw the seachem reference at 10ppm - that looked pretty interesting. Doesn't mean the test kit will be accurate well above that but sounds a handy check if something is amiss.

 

-------------------------------------

 

Tempted to try this (I think I have the range right?) -

 

(kit K-6909D)

https://www.chemetri...CFZ4IKgodh34JiQ

 

0-45 ppm as N.

Results are expressed as ppm (mg/L) NO3-N or NO3.

To convert results from ppm NO3-N to ppm NO3, multiply by 4.43.

 

 

 

And looked up the technical data sheet - yikes!

 

Interference Information:

Iron, copper and other metals, oil and grease, chloride at concentrations >2,000 ppm, high levels of chlorine and other halogens, and sample turbidity will decrease the efficiency of the cadmium reduction step,

causing low test results. Interferences from some metals may be minimized by treatment of the sample with EDTA solution. Turbid samples can be filtered prior to analysis.

 

Thiosulfate causes low test results.

 

Nitrite interferes by reading positively with the test and by decreasing the efficiency of the cadmium reduction step. Test results will be biased high when nitrite is present at detectable levels.

 

Some fertilizers may produce a pale orange color with the reagent.

 

The sample pH should be between 5 and 9 for most efficient cadmium reduction.



#23 bigjohnnofish

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 02:01 AM

 

Firstly, I’ll need to let Sharon know that she should be using the consistent 160ppm+ nitrate readings she’s been getting from her near new API kit when testing her lightly stocked, well maintained tank, and use them to plot trends.  From this she will be able to determine her maintenance regime going forward, even if that indicates that she needs to do twice daily, 90% water changes to get the readings down to anything like recommended levels for her fish. 

 

 

well you have overlooked something here that possibly only knowledgeable people with a good understanding of aquaria and experience will know...

 

in my younger years keeping fish i discovered i had 160ppm of nitrate in my tank... oh dear i have neglected my fish... ring ring - talk to my local fishop - advises me to do 50% water change straight up.... i do... i retest nitrates an hour later.... still approx 160ppm.... hmmmm... ring ring - talk to my local fishop - advises me to do another 50% change following day and retest... and again following day and retest and then give him a call....  i do and my nitrate test is reading approx 100ppm now..... ring ring - he proceeds to tell me when you get such high nitrates your filtration becomes a nitrate hoarder and when you water change the nitrates out they are simply leaching back out into your water from your filtration... it will take several days of 50% water changes to get your nitrate levels down.... alternatively you can clean your filtration but be extremely careful not to deplete your beneficial bacteria as your tank is vulnerable to a host of other potential problems by doing this along with lots of 50% water changes... also you will need to gravel clean your gravel but dont do this , clean your filter and continue with 50% water changes at the same time... recommend cleaning filter about every 6-8 weeks and also gravel clean every 6-8 weeks but 3-4 weeks apart from cleaning filter.... and establishing a regular water change routine that keeps nitrates under 80ppm but closer to 40ppm and under....  i still remember this as fresh as the day he told me... was a long time ago too......



#24 bigjohnnofish

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 02:08 AM

Interference Information:

Iron, copper and other metals, oil and grease, chloride at concentrations >2,000 ppm, high levels of chlorine and other halogens, and sample turbidity will decrease the efficiency of the cadmium reduction step,

causing low test results. Interferences from some metals may be minimized by treatment of the sample with EDTA solution. Turbid samples can be filtered prior to analysis.

 

Thiosulfate causes low test results.

 

Nitrite interferes by reading positively with the test and by decreasing the efficiency of the cadmium reduction step. Test results will be biased high when nitrite is present at detectable levels.

 

Some fertilizers may produce a pale orange color with the reagent.

 

The sample pH should be between 5 and 9 for most efficient cadmium reduction.

 

is a multitude of potential contaminants that can mess with accuracy of test kits....  im a fan of using EDTA in my prep water before it gets pumped into my tanks...



#25 humbug

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 08:55 AM

Sorry in advance – another long post
 

Mattia – on other threads where this topic has been discussed I’ve made exactly that case myself.  Perhaps the problems are caused by the products sitting on shelves for long periods of time, or stored incorrectly.  There is good logic in the argument and possibly/probably is the answer is many cases.  It doesn’t excuse the fact that the kits SHOULD be good for the whole of their stated shelf life though. 
 

But . . . . . can I put this one to you?  What would make you actually question the results you are getting with API kits?  A customer comes in and says his fish are dying and asks you to do a water test.  You do the test and it indicates everything is fine.  You then start down the route of looking for another possible cause.  It’s the logical course of action for someone . . . . anyone . . . .  in your situation, if you have a degree of confidence in the product you are using. There is absolutely nothing there to trigger any suspicion in your mind.  This isn’t a criticism in anyway.  I’ve been there myself . . . .
 

Look at the first two shops in the example of “Larry” I gave.  They both tested Larry’s water and found no problem.  I bet if I asked those guys if they had faith in the kits they would say they did.  If they didn’t have faith, they wouldn’t be using them. Those guys also test a hell of a lot of water samples each week and never see anything to indicate they are "THAT BAD".  But if they never question the results, then how would they ever realise they missed the problem? I have no doubt they know how to use the kits correctly, and are using fresh stock.  It was only the third shop who has a healthy scepticism of API kits who guessed the issue and eventually identified Larry’s problem.  How many hobbyists actually take it that far?  I bet most would just take the advice given by the first shop.  I wonder if Larry ever returned to those other two shops to let them know what he found.  I'm guessing that the first two shops may have lost a customer, but that shop number three has gained another loyal customer now.
 

I personally used API for my own tanks for many years, and I also didn’t see anything to really trigger a suspicion during that time.  Thinking back now though, I do remember times when I was struggling with "high nitrates". The example that REALLY got me thinking relates directly to the issue bigjohnofish brings up
 

In this case a guy was posting on Facebook about his nitrate problem.  It was a long thread which ran over a considerable period of time.  Surprising for Facebook, but the guy was actually getting some decent advice.  He started out with large water change, after large water change.  His nitrate would drop a bit, but be back up to off-the-scale levels in no time.  He was advised to test his tap water – zero nitrate. He was advised to clean his filter.  He cleaned it again, even though it had been cleaned recently.  He was told to clean his substrate.  He did, and it was suggested he hadn’t done it thoroughly.  The story went on and on.  This poor guy was completely at wits end.  He even posted a video showing him stirring up the substrate in his tank to demonstrate how clean it was.  His nitrates were still off the chart.  I see that and think about the grief the poor guy went through, and the unnecessary stress the fish suffered, and cringe.  If I get a bit of time later I'll see if I can hunt the thread down for those on Facebook.  It was 2015 from memory.  It makes for a good read, and I found it an incredible eye-opener.
 

That’s the point at which I decided to pull out the kits I had here and do some testing myself.  They are the results in my initial post.  API 40ppm & 160ppm, JBL 10ppm on the same sample.  This tank is a 6x2x2 running on a 240 litre sump.  I have an established 8x2x2” Marine Pure block in a low flow section of the sump for nitrate reduction.  Tank at that time was a Tanganyikan community tank and was lightly stocked and my feeding was minimal.  Sump maintenance is very regular.  Only a light scattering of sand in the tank.  At the time I had already changed to JBL kits after advice from a trusted LFS.  If I had only been testing using even the better of my two API kits, I would have concluded that the Marine Pure block was useless.
 

Within a short time of this happening, “Sharon” was posting on one of our local groups.  She seemed to have a similar problem.  Clean, lightly stocked tank, regular substantial water changes, nitrates through the roof.  I went around and personally had a look at her tank.  Seriously, you really couldn’t fault what she was doing.  A novice, but a lovely lady who takes her fish keeping seriously.  She is well read.  I have little doubt that the filter or substrate could have been acting as a nitrate sink in this case.  Before she launched into a major breakdown of her tank I suggested we try another kit.  That’s the results I posted the photo of.  We both tested using her kit and both got the same result.  Tap water was testing zero with both kits.
 

You will notice that in my initial posts I mentioned that these results are showing up in well maintained tanks for this very reason.
 

Since then, I’ve seen many of these “problems” crop up on Facebook groups.  Common factor – API kits.
 

What I’m saying is that instead of a possible problem with the kit being the LAST thing people consider in these situations, I firmly believe it needs to be considered much earlier in the problem solving cycle.  It should be ruled out as a possibility as one of the initial steps, BEFORE those significant interventions are made.   
 

If I can just place that little level of doubt in people’s minds, and can encourage people to give the possibility of a dud kit a thought when trouble shooting, then I suspect people may start to realise that these issues are more widespread than they believe.
 

And PLEASE don’t just focus on nitrate.  I know of a number of cases of both nitrite and ammonia poisoning not being identified by API kits.


Edited by humbug, 09 June 2017 - 03:52 PM.


#26 sydad

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 01:26 PM

 

is a multitude of potential contaminants that can mess with accuracy of test kits....  im a fan of using EDTA in my prep water before it gets pumped into my tanks...

 

Why?



#27 Delapool

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 09:10 PM

Not sure how just one different bell sound, but we use API test kits at the shop and so far I can't really say that they're THAT BAD.
I even tested water with JBL and API kits next to each other and got pretty similar results... BUT, said that, we do loads (too many sometimes ) tests per days, and our bottles can be considered always "Fresh" ... maybe it has to do with how people keep and maintain their test kits?
Once I left my test kits in car for a week.... it was full summer..... :D

 

Today I got 18ppm nitrate with JBL and API I thought 5 to 10ppm / everyone else 20ppm. So fairly happy. Now I have a good spot for the JBL it's going well.



#28 Delapool

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 09:20 PM

 

is a multitude of potential contaminants that can mess with accuracy of test kits....  im a fan of using EDTA in my prep water before it gets pumped into my tanks...

 

That's a pretty cool use I thought - so used to plants I had to look it up to catch on (hopefully). Made me wonder what water conditioners that detoxify heavy metals use. 


Sorry in advance – another long post
 

Mattia – on other threads where this topic has been discussed I’ve made exactly that case myself.  Perhaps the problems are caused by the products sitting on shelves for long periods of time, or stored incorrectly.  There is good logic in the argument and possibly/probably is the answer is many cases.  It doesn’t excuse the fact that the kits SHOULD be good for the whole of their stated shelf life though. 
 

But . . . . . can I put this one to you?  What would make you actually question the results you are getting with API kits?  A customer comes in and says his fish are dying and asks you to do a water test.  You do the test and it indicates everything is fine.  You then start down the route of looking for another possible cause.  It’s the logical course of action for someone . . . . anyone . . . .  in your situation, if you have a degree of confidence in the product you are using. There is absolutely nothing there to trigger any suspicion in your mind.  This isn’t a criticism in anyway.  I’ve been there myself . . . .
 

Look at the first two shops in the example of “Larry” I gave.  They both tested Larry’s water and found no problem.  I bet if I asked those guys if they had faith in the kits they would say they did.  If they didn’t have faith, they wouldn’t be using them. Those guys also test a hell of a lot of water samples each week and never see anything to indicate they are "THAT BAD".  But if they never question the results, then how would they ever realise they missed the problem? I have no doubt they know how to use the kits correctly, and are using fresh stock.  It was only the third shop who has a healthy scepticism of API kits who guessed the issue and eventually identified Larry’s problem.  How many hobbyists actually take it that far?  I bet most would just take the advice given by the first shop.  I wonder if Larry ever returned to those other two shops to let them know what he found.  I'm guessing that the first two shops may have lost a customer, but that shop number three has gained another loyal customer now.
 

I personally used API for my own tanks for many years, and I also didn’t see anything to really trigger a suspicion during that time.  Thinking back now though, I do remember times when I was struggling with "high nitrates". The example that REALLY got me thinking relates directly to the issue bigjohnofish brings up
 

In this case a guy was posting on Facebook about his nitrate problem.  It was a long thread which ran over a considerable period of time.  Surprising for Facebook, but the guy was actually getting some decent advice.  He started out with large water change, after large water change.  His nitrate would drop a bit, but be back up to off-the-scale levels in no time.  He was advised to test his tap water – zero nitrate. He was advised to clean his filter.  He cleaned it again, even though it had been cleaned recently.  He was told to clean his substrate.  He did, and it was suggested he hadn’t done it thoroughly.  The story went on and on.  This poor guy was completely at wits end.  He even posted a video showing him stirring up the substrate in his tank to demonstrate how clean it was.  His nitrates were still off the chart.  I see that and think about the grief the poor guy went through, and the unnecessary stress the fish suffered, and cringe.  If I get a bit of time later I'll see if I can hunt the thread down for those on Facebook.  It was 2015 from memory.  It makes for a good read, and I found it an incredible eye-opener.
 

That’s the point at which I decided to pull out the kits I had here and do some testing myself.  They are the results in my initial post.  API 40ppm & 160ppm, JBL 10ppm on the same sample.  This tank is a 6x2x2 running on a 240 litre sump.  I have an established 8x2x2” Marine Pure block in a low flow section of the sump for nitrate reduction.  Tank at that time was a Tanganyikan community tank and was lightly stocked and my feeding was minimal.  Sump maintenance is very regular.  Only a light scattering of sand in the tank.  At the time I had already changed to JBL kits after advice from a trusted LFS.  If I had only been testing using even the better of my two API kits, I would have concluded that the Marine Pure block was useless.
 

Within a short time of this happening, “Sharon” was posting on one of our local groups.  She seemed to have a similar problem.  Clean, lightly stocked tank, regular substantial water changes, nitrates through the roof.  I went around and personally had a look at her tank.  Seriously, you really couldn’t fault what she was doing.  A novice, but a lovely lady who takes her fish keeping seriously.  She is well read.  I have little doubt that the filter or substrate could have been acting as a nitrate sink in this case.  Before she launched into a major breakdown of her tank I suggested we try another kit.  That’s the results I posted the photo of.  We both tested using her kit and both got the same result.  Tap water was testing zero with both kits.
 

You will notice that in my initial posts I mentioned that these results are showing up in well maintained tanks for this very reason.
 

Since then, I’ve seen many of these “problems” crop up on Facebook groups.  Common factor – API kits.
 

What I’m saying is that instead of a possible problem with the kit being the LAST thing people consider in these situations, I firmly believe it needs to be considered much earlier in the problem solving cycle.  It should be ruled out as a possibility as one of the initial steps, BEFORE those significant interventions are made.   
 

If I can just place that little level of doubt in people’s minds, and can encourage people to give the possibility of a dud kit a thought when trouble shooting, then I suspect people may start to realise that these issues are more widespread than they believe.
 

And PLEASE don’t just focus on nitrate.  I know of a number of cases of both nitrite and ammonia poisoning not being identified by API kits.

 

This finally rang a bell on a few US threads several years back which had high nitrates. I believe there was an issue with something very high in the water and the tests looked murky. Any thoughts on what was causing the test to fail? I'm wondering if the test was reading 0 I think it was in tap water, then was there something in the tank chemistry or just a bad test kit or ??

 

I ended up buying the test kit below so will see if results are any different.

 

https://www.chemetri...&product_id=120



#29 chrishaigh82

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 10:31 PM

Nitrates always the sketchy test for us from our in house and confirmed with LFS.  Had experiences of dumping 50% daily for three days and still the same high Nitrates?  Wish there was an awesome digital set up that was bullet proof....


Edited by chrishaigh82, 14 June 2017 - 09:02 PM.


#30 bigjohnnofish

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 02:02 AM

 

Why?

 

reduces the toxicity of heavy metals...  and thats something we up here in mundaring seem to get.... 

had problems with albino b/n years ago - with them losing their yellowy pigment and going white before dying.... 

after trying several different things... used edta in their change water and pretty much got instant results with no more white deaths... when i stopped using it - white deaths as i called them started to re-appear... so i started using edta more regularly.... it effected mainly small fry up to 3-4cm but occassionaly took out bigger fish as well.... 



#31 sydad

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 11:39 AM

 

reduces the toxicity of heavy metals...  and thats something we up here in mundaring seem to get.... 

had problems with albino b/n years ago - with them losing their yellowy pigment and going white before dying.... 

after trying several different things... used edta in their change water and pretty much got instant results with no more white deaths... when i stopped using it - white deaths as i called them started to re-appear... so i started using edta more regularly.... it effected mainly small fry up to 3-4cm but occassionaly took out bigger fish as well.... 

 

Umm, not quite true about "reducing the toxicity of heavy metals".  EDTA, usually employed in one of three sodium forms, binds most metals by a process of chelation. All good and well, but the concentration of EDTA usable in aquaria is very low. At higher levels EDTA has a bacteriostatic/bactericidal propensity, but such levels are toxic to fishes. The lower levels usable in aquaria are actually to be regarded as biodegradable (it is after all an organic entity), and when broken down by biological action, naturally releases any chelated metals. Fortunately for  aquarists, this is a relatively slow process, and released metals are progressively bound by other means, with some remaining in solution: these of course will be eliminated during water changes.

 

 

I carried out, several years ago,  a series of experiments using copper salts which I added to aquaria treated with disodium EDTA. The long and short of the matter was evident when I stopped water changes. The levels of copper released from the degraded EDTA increased, and although few fish living in aquaria so affected were lost, any newly added fishes to those aquaria died very quickly, as unlike the original inhabitants, they had no opportunity to become habituated to the copper levels which were slowly increasing as a result of the EDTA degradation. This of course opens the possibility of a whole new dialogue on metal toxicities, but I have no intention of going there now.

 

My point is that EDTA can be a double edged sword, and anyone relying on it needs to be aware of possible shortcomings in it's protective mechanism.

 

Syd.

 

Apologies, but this has drifted off-topic.


Edited by sydad, 10 June 2017 - 02:11 PM.


#32 stewie17

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Posted 13 June 2017 - 05:30 PM

having nitrite and nitrate problems at the moment using the api kits nothing i have tried or been recomended to try has redused the nitrates and nitrites, waterchanges and treatment with seachem prime are achieving nothing, still reading high nitrates and niterites



#33 malawiman85

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Posted 13 June 2017 - 08:33 PM

Nitrates are good. Means bacteria is working.
Prime temporarily makes ammo and nitrite non toxic doesn't make it go away. Manage with prime and water changes and relax a bit.
Nitrate bad over 40 other than that it's fine. Even at 40 it's not a big deal.

#34 Delapool

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Posted 13 June 2017 - 10:11 PM

having nitrite and nitrate problems at the moment using the api kits nothing i have tried or been recomended to try has redused the nitrates and nitrites, waterchanges and treatment with seachem prime are achieving nothing, still reading high nitrates and niterites


1 ppm ammonia --> 2.7 ppm nitrite --> 3.6 ppm nitrate.




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#35 Ageofaquariums

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Posted 14 June 2017 - 02:17 PM

I’m so glad you cleared that all up for us Age of Aquariums.  If I’m understanding your advice correctly – those who get odd results from API test kits are dim-wits unable to follow simple instructions, and those who speak out openly about potential issues are “prolific posters”, who’s experiences aren’t valid, and should be ignored.
 

So now furnished with this new-found knowledge, it seems I have a bit of work ahead of me. 
 

Firstly, I’ll need to let Sharon know that she should be using the consistent 160ppm+ nitrate readings she’s been getting from her near new API kit when testing her lightly stocked, well maintained tank, and use them to plot trends.  From this she will be able to determine her maintenance regime going forward, even if that indicates that she needs to do twice daily, 90% water changes to get the readings down to anything like recommended levels for her fish. 
 

I’ll need to pass similar advice on to Adam . . . . . and Ken  . . . . . . and Andrew . . . . . . and Debby . . . . . .  who have had similar experiences.  In the future when I encounter guys tearing their hair out trying to reduce unbelievably high nitrate levels in their tanks – I’ll let them know not to worry!!!   All they need to do is plot trends!!  Just like with Sharon, it will solve all their problems!
 

I’ll let Larry know that the first two LFS he went to who couldn’t help him identify his tank issues got it totally wrong.  They should have got him to bring in water samples over an extended period of time so they too could “plot trends”.  Trends of zero nitrite, and low nitrates in all likelihood, based on their initial findings.  Hopefully they will come to some sort of conclusion based on those trends before he loses the rest of his fish. 
 

But geesh - that third LFS Larry went to must have had rocks in their head!!!  Why on earth would they even contemplating doubting the accuracy of API tests and retest using another brand? And why on earth would they think that the nitrite level they identified could be a pointer to an issue?  It just beggars belief.  I’ll let them know their course of action was entirely unwarranted.  Apparently API have a low failure rate.
 

I’m in a bit of confusion here though – should I instead be dropping a note to the two LFS that originally tested Larry’s water and found no nitrite and low nitrates, and pass on the advice about “user error”?  Do we assume that they too are struggling to follow the kit instructions?  Or maybe they accidently swapped the caps of the bottles over? 
 

Eeekk – I can see this is all going to take me a bit of time.  Ummmmmm . . . . .  what’s next on my list? 
 

I need to let Sandra know that the vet she had out to attend to her mystery fish deaths, who got an ammonia reading using his Sera kit while Sandra’s API kit registered zero, has come to entirely the wrong conclusion.  He’s likely just another of these incompetent souls who suffers from “user error” with API kits, and has misguidedly switched to Sera.  I wonder if Sandra will pass the message on to the vet for me to save me one call . . . . I’m starting to get nervous about my phone bill now.
 

After all that, I’ll need to sit back with a coffee and somehow reconcile with myself those fry deaths in my tank.  Bugger – user error again.  I should have known! My incompetence was responsible for not getting a nitrite reading using a perfectly adequate test kit.  But then that begs the question - should I go as far as to contact the Uni and let them know those high distinctions I got in chemistry must have been a clerical mistake? I’m incapable of placing five drops of a single reagent into a sample of water and shaking it!  I can’t possibly have stumbled my way through all those uni pracs!
 

Hmmm – I can see I’ve got a busy day ahead of myself here.  No time to finish that coffee.
 

But here’s my real problem.  What am I going to say to the specialist aquarium shops who, through personal experience and customer feedback, have stopped stocking API kits?  Guys with decades of experience in fish keeping and the industry.  I had massive respect for these guys, and I now realise that respect was misplaced.  Hmmm – obviously they too are misguided in their opinions. Their mistaken views on these kits, and their decisions to place their ethics ahead of profit, were simply idiotic.  Think of the money they have lost through sales!!!!  More dumb-asses I guess.  Good job that they felt unable to publicly voice their concerns because of the potential implications of future dealings with a large wholesaler.  If they had voiced those concerns, they would now have egg on their faces based on this latest info.  But I’m still not quite sure how best to break this astounding news to those guys . . . . . . .
 

I’m exhausted already just thinking about it all.  I’m glad the failure rate of API kits “is very low”.  Imagine the task I would be facing now if it was higher!!!
 

I guess when I’m asked in future for advice about alternative brands, I’ll just have to let people know that apparently while they may be capable of using two reagent bottles for a test, three bottles will likely prove too taxing for them.  And I mean, who actually cares about getting a meaningful result from their kit anyway – ease of use is far more important!  And fancy even considering a kit with a powder????   That’s simply beyond the capabilities of anyone without a higher degree in chemistry.

 

Or perhaps . . . . just perhaps . . . . I should be just a tiny, weeny bit sceptical of the above response, knowing that perhaps there may be a tincey, incey, wincey little bit of a vested interest involved in defending a product.  But no, that would be very wrong of me to even contemplate that a company with a considerable turn-over of these products, and in receipt of discounts based on their sales volumes, might provide such a response . . . . . .

 

As I said before, perhaps the alternative action is for hobbyists to take caution using test kit results - ANY RESULTS.  If you consider yourself capable of contending with three bottles of liquid reagent instead of two, or going as far as dealing with the immense complexities of a spoonful of powder, then perhaps take that massive leap and consider an alternative brand. 
 

PS – names above have been changed in an attempt to protect the identity of the misguided, ill-informed, dim-wits involved ;)


Just so you know - the kits we have come across that are giving such high results for nitrates still give zero results when on used on samples of tap water. 
 

 

 

Could you be any more emotionally invested in this?

This sort of reply is why my boss's wonder why I bother getting involved in any threads here. Never mind the fact we sell a dozen brands of test kits, or that I have a lab back ground.

Or that I have been doing these tests daily for decades.

Just jump in and go on the offensive.

Well you win, congrats.

Hope it improves ya jbl sales.

Donny out.



#36 Delapool

Delapool

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 08:12 AM

Deep breathes people's, in with the good

In other news the company was out of the test kit so on back order...


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#37 Westie

Westie

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 06:04 PM

No Donny don't gooooooo..........
Ok he's gone. I just got my iPhone camera lens in the mail today. Thanks for the tip to get one.
Actually...... I accidentally pressed the Pay Now button 3 times in my excitement to buy 1 and have 2 spare. If anyone wants one let me know.




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