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15 replies to this topic

#1 pseudechisbutleri

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Posted 07 September 2018 - 11:09 AM

I want to set up a deep sand bed for my soon-to-be reef tank, is it just a matter of creating a deep bed of sand, or is there more to it? Also, what would happen if all or part of the surface of the DSB were to be exposed to air?

The reason for the second question relates to why I want the DSB in the first place, which is not for nitrate reduction (though this is a benefit nonetheless), but to create an elevated area in the tank in order to accommodate for mudskippers. I initially tried to do this by creating a slope of sand, with one end being a few centimeters deep, and the other being around 20 centimeters deep, but I soon realised that the combination of a shallow and deep sand bed would create problems, so I am now planning to set up the DSB in a separate chamber inside the display tank, using an old sump baffle.

#2 pseudechisbutleri

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Posted 09 September 2018 - 02:11 PM

Any input?



#3 malawiman85

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Posted 11 September 2018 - 09:46 AM

Reef tank or Brackish/marine fish only (FO)?

Depends on type of sub used. Are you planning to use strictly inert materials? I would and you probably do intend to as well. The issue with any sub and more so with deeper subs is the water quality can suffer as a result of decomposing organic matter. Even with inert subs you will get fish crap settling into it affecting water quality over time.

With mudskippers you will likely have a really low bioload given they're small and territorial... This will mitigate the negative effects of a deep sub. There are benefits to deeper subs, particularly if you use an under-gravel filter... Pretty underrated. Perhaps the best (and maybe most successful) fish breeding setup i've seen in Perth uses under-gravel filters in most tanks... Cant  really be used with sand though.

If you plan on overstocking mudskippers, consider using "rocky islands" rather than a single "sandy beach" this greatly helps reduce the territorial squabbles. 


Edited by malawiman85, 11 September 2018 - 09:51 AM.


#4 pseudechisbutleri

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Posted 11 September 2018 - 11:34 AM

It's gonna be a full on reef tank, 35L shallow tank (so it has the footprint of a 2 foot tank).

 

I think my substrate is inert. It stays relatively free of decomposing material, thanks to both water movement and the CUC (a couple pistol shrimp and gobies).

 

A sand slope looks more natural and reminiscent of nature, but not only might it lose its form over time (if not immediately), but I'm worried about what'll happen if a sand bed contains both a shallow and deep end. I'm still open to a sand slope but another option could just be an internal DSB/sand bank for the skippers.

 

I'll incorporate both rocky islands and a sand bank, as I do plan on stocking a few mudskippers (maybe a pair of clowns too, though I might need to beef up my filtration).


Edited by pseudechisbutleri, 11 September 2018 - 11:39 AM.


#5 Jules

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Posted 11 September 2018 - 03:01 PM

Can mudskippers handle full salinity (1.026 ppm salinity) of a reef system?

 

I thought they where brackish, and have even heard of people keeping them in full fresh, never in full salt though!



#6 malawiman85

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Posted 11 September 2018 - 03:33 PM

Clowns can be very territorial... I dunno... I honestly think you need to reconsider.
Full depth reef or a dsb brackish.

#7 ice

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Posted 11 September 2018 - 04:38 PM

I wonder if you could terrace the tank with glass dividers going from high to low internally and fill them with something solid like epoxy or something like that, would keep the sand shallower and allow you to have a fairly natural looking slope that would only be able to erode away to a certain extent before exposing the mini retaining walls... much easier to do gravel cleans and easier to fix your slope if it does erode away.



#8 pseudechisbutleri

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Posted 11 September 2018 - 05:07 PM

I think mudskippers can handle full strength saltwater, they pretty much live in full (or nearly full) strength saltwater. Id just need to acclimate carefully. With that said, Ive never see mudskippers being kept in a fully saltwater tank, but Im pretty sure it can be done.

Are all clowns aggressive? I thought the true Perculas were a little more placid than ocellariss. Plus the mudskippers would be spending most of their time out of the water, away from the clowns.

Ice, thats a good idea but I think that would take a fair amount of silicone/epoxy. Plus I already bought the silicone :P

Edited by pseudechisbutleri, 11 September 2018 - 05:08 PM.


#9 ice

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Posted 11 September 2018 - 05:25 PM

Expanding foam with a silicone cap?



#10 pseudechisbutleri

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Posted 11 September 2018 - 05:32 PM

Though I've seen many amazing tanks with foam components (e.g. backgrounds), I prefer to keep my tanks natural (e.g. just real plants,real rocks and real substrate) e.g. no plastic/artificial ornaments/decor. But the suggestion is appreciated :)


Edited by pseudechisbutleri, 11 September 2018 - 05:33 PM.


#11 malawiman85

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Posted 11 September 2018 - 05:51 PM

Seen millions of mudskippers in full marine.
Tank is too small for what you want to do with clowns.
I wouldn't put clowns in less than 65 Ltrs

#12 pseudechisbutleri

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Posted 11 September 2018 - 05:58 PM

I thought clowns could be housed in smallish tanks?

#13 malawiman85

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Posted 11 September 2018 - 06:03 PM

They can... you can live in your bedroom too but you'd hate it and eventually want to die.

#14 pseudechisbutleri

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Posted 11 September 2018 - 08:14 PM


I see, what other fish could I put in the tank, other than the skippers?

Edited by pseudechisbutleri, 11 September 2018 - 08:22 PM.


#15 malawiman85

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Posted 11 September 2018 - 08:24 PM

It's hard with a small tank set up for skippers. To be honest I can't think of anything that would be suitable. Maybe pipe fish or a seahorse... if the skippers will leave them alone... not sure.

#16 pseudechisbutleri

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Posted 11 September 2018 - 09:31 PM

A pipefish would probably make a snack for the mudskippers, seahorses might be okay with mudskippers, and I might put a couple in.

But seahorses are more of a display refugium fish, not a reef tank fish. Maybe a banggai or two?




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